Windhorse News & Events

April 12, “The hidden role of repressed anger in our  lives, relationships and spiritual practice.” Part 4 from 5 of Thursday evening series “Spirituality and the Unconscious”

“Our deepest fears are like dragons guarding our deepest treasures.”
– RAINER MARIA RILKE

From March 22 – April 19, 2018 Windhorse Zen Community will offer a 5-part Thursday evening series Spirituality and the Unconscious at Jubilee! Community Church.

Lawson Sachter and Sunya Kjolhede, co-abbots of Windhorse, will guide these sessions, which will include talks, group interaction, and meditation.

Those who pre-register will receive optional readings before each gathering. People are welcome to attend one or more of these evenings.

March 22, 6:30-8:15pm

The intriguing unconscious: an overview.

 

March 29, 6:30-8:15pm      

The modern epidemic of loneliness.

 

April 5, 6:30-8:15pm             

The influence of shame and guilt on Western spirituality.

 

April 12, 6:30-8:15pm            

The hidden role of repressed anger in our  lives, relationships and spiritual practice.

 

April 19, 6:30-8:15pm           

The Way of the Bodhisattva and the Sense of the Sacred.

 

To register: http://windhorsezen.org/spirituality-and-the-unconscious/


The intriguing unconscious: an overview. (March 22, 6:30-8:15pm)

 The first of five gatherings on Spirituality and the Unconscious will involve a broad overview of this topic.

As the series unfolds we’ll be looking more specifically at the role of the unconscious, in both its compassionate and destructive forms, in this process of deepening and opening through various kinds of meditation and other “prayerful” endeavors.

To give a general background to all this we’ve made a list, below, of quotations and general resources that offer a range of understandings on the nature of the unconscious itself.

 

Carl Jung wrote extensively on the subject of transformation and the unconscious. Here are a number of his quotations:

 “Until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate.” 

“In each of us there is another whom we do not know.”

“Knowing your own darkness is the best method for dealing with the darknesses of other people.”

“Whatever is rejected from the self, appears in the world as an event.”

Man strives toward reason only so that he can make rules for himself. Life itself has no rules. That is its mystery and its unknown law. What you call knowledge is an attempt to impose something comprehensible on life.”

 “There is no coming to consciousness without pain. People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in order to avoid facing their own Soul. One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light, but by making the darkness conscious.”

“There can be no transforming of darkness into light and of apathy into movement without emotion”

 “Wholeness is not achieved by cutting off a portion of one’s being, but by integration of the contraries.”

At least some of the material on the dynamics of the psyche that we’ll be working with rests on the work of Habib Davanloo, M.D, and his metapsychology of the unconscious.

Dr. Davanloo’s two main books are:

Unlocking the Unconscious and Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy

Milton Erickson offers quite a different perspective on the unconscious:

The Wisdom of Milton Erickson – Volumes I thru III

Uncommon Therapy – Jay Haley

Freud, of course, has written volumes on all this —


And the following article by Polly Young-Eisendrath offers a compelling view of Jung’s work from the perspective of a Buddhist understanding of the depths of the psyche:  The Buddhist Unconscious (Alaya-vijnana) and Jung’s Collective Unconscious: What Does It Mean to be Liberated from the Self?